Vágur & World War II

Day 10 of my travels with The Clipperton Project around the Faroe Islands.

Today we packed up our stuff in Tòrshavn and headed out on our journey to Vágur, where we would (eventually!) be meeting our boat.

Vágur is on the southernmost island of Suðuroy, which we travelled down to by ferry from Tòrshavn. The ride over was beautifully calm, and as we were on it for a couple of hours, I managed to get a good bit of journalling and design doodling done.

 

Unfortunately, when we arrived in Vágur, The Johanna wasn’t quite ready for us… so, it was another night in a hostel. It did give us some time to explore the town though…

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We came across this wonderful little museum which had a weird and wonderful collection of items and photographs from Vágur during World War II.

The Faroe Islands, Faroese ships and Faroese crew were of vast importance to Great Britain during World War II (1940-1945). Most of the British ships were in the early years of the war rebuilt to warships and for the same reason there were few British fishing vessels in operation. The demand for fish in Britain was large, and here the Faroese ships and crews came to play an important role.

Each week Faroese ships transported 100s of tonnes of fish to the British market. The fish was transported from Iceland and the Faroe Islands to Britain, mostly to harbourd in the north of Britain. All in all Faroese ships made 2.354 trip to Britain with 152.000 tonnes of fish to a value of 198 million Danish kroners.

The voyages through the battle zones in the North Atlantic did though have their high prize. During the years of World War II 205 Faroese men were casualties of war acts on the sea and 39 ships were lost. Of these 9 ships were from Vágur, of which 4 were lost with all hands. 27 men lost their lives with these ships, 14 from Vágur.

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Sadly there wasn’t much information about these, but I loved these photographs of a Scottish regiment that stayed here during World War II.

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These model boats were all made by the curator of the museum, Poul Niclassen, who spent years crafting these vessels that from Vágur that were used in the war, in his little home workshop.

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After the museum we wandered through the town a little more.

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Yup! that is a dried up fish head lying in the port!

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Dad! this sea mine photo is for you!!

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Planning our route with the Johanna! in our cosy little hostel.

Luli Noriega Pons

This sock was knitted by Lynne Reed on her travels around the Faroes!! photo by Nils Aksnes.

Nils Aksnes (Lynne Sock)

 

More to come soon!!

Stay tuned!

Chloe out.

 

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