Mossycoat: The Making Of – Part 2

You might remember a good wee while ago I made Mossycoat.

You probably also remember that I wasn’t quite happy with what I made?

Well I made her again!

And she is awesome!

So, I thought I’d share with ya’ll how I made her (if you need to refresh your memory of part 1, visit this blog post).

 

Draw the pendant piece circles, which are a little larger than last time, and slightly thicker. The pendant needs to be a little heavier because the weight of the beads made the other one not sit quite right.

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Saw out circles (I’ve kept the insides in because I used this opportunity to etch a sample for a Faery Wings piece).

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Paint on etching fluid.

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Scrape away etching fluid into awesome mossy pattern!

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Etch!

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With the nitric acid way of etching, you need to constantly keep watch over it, and carefully wipe away air bubbles with a brush every minute or so to achieve an even etch.

This etch was quite deep, so was left in for about 20minutes.

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Saw out inner circle.

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Drill holes all the way around the outside and inside circles and clean up.

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The discs where then sealed up in a bag and put to the side while I made the mossy pebbles (which will replace the little etched pieces of brass in the beaded chain).

Cut out nine rough pebble-like shapes.

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Anneal.

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And pickle.

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Now the soft metal can be formed.

I use the traditional way because the metal takes up a rough shape and it gets dented and marked with the little imperfections in the hammer and the texture of the sandbag which is perfect for a natural look….. and hammering metal into shape is intensely satisfying!

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Clean up and smooth the edges.

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Punch holes all the way around the edges.

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Drill holes!

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And clean up.

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Paint with etching fluid on both sides.

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Etch! They are supposed to look like pebbles with moss growing over them.

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Fire clean up pebbles to get rid of any excess etching fluid and give the brass an oxidised colour.

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Rub back with sandpaper and steel wool to achieve a rough patina… like a pebble!

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Seal pebbles in a bag and place to the side.

Now comes another disc shape (this one is replacing the jagged crown).

Fire metal with a variety of patinas, as well as a little silver solder, to create a mossy colour and texture.

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Like so!

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Draw circle shapes.

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Saw out circles.

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Drill holes around both edges and clean up back.

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With all the metal elements complete it’s time to move onto the stitching!

First, melt little segments of the silk organza to create a torn texture.

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Collect, clean and dry out moss.

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Sew moss into pebbles with golden thread.

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Sew moss between two slivers of heat-altered organza and sandwich between the brass discs with golden thread.

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Stitch golden thread around mossy disc, covering the back with golden thread.

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Lay out design. Cut out old metal elements, until only the beading remains.

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Beading time!

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Re-stitch various new elements into existing beading.

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And……… you’ll just have to wait for the next post to see how it turned out :)

Chloe out.

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